Environment

Microplastics pollution focus of Evening @ Skidaway Nov. 16

Tiny pieces of plastic are so pervasive in Georgia’s coastal waters, researchers estimate there are more than a trillion microplastic particles and fibers in the top foot of the state’s inshore waterways. The issue of microplastics in coastal waters and what, if anything, can be done about them will be the focus of a special… Read more »

 

UGA Skidaway Institute's Jay Brandes interviewed on public radio

UGA Skidaway Institute’s Jay Brandes was a featured interview guest on Georgia Public Broadcasting this week, talking about his work with microplastics in the marine environment. http://www.gpb.org/blogs/community/2017/01/17/community-conversations-skidaway-scientist-on-mission-measure-ocean?utm_source=eGaMorning&utm_campaign=b51e5a8395-1_18_17&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_54a77f93dd-b51e5a8395-86742941

 

Skidaway Institute Arctic carbon research gets additional exposure

The Website Environmental Monitor published a good article on some of the work Skidaway Institute scientist Aron Stubbins has been conducting on carbon in black carbon in the Arctic.  http://www.fondriest.com/news/arctic-ocean-biochar-could-increase-with-global-warming.htm

 

Jay Brandes interviewed on GPB

Skidaway Institute professor Jay Brandes was interviewed on Georgia Public Broadcasting regarding the recent move to ban microbeads and his upcoming project on microplastic pollution on the Georgia coast. http://www.gpb.org/news/2016/01/13/microbeads-banned-plastic-remains-threat-oceans

 

Skidaway Institute scientist shares Gulf oil spill research grant

University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography scientist Catherine Edwards is part of a research team that has received an $18.8 million grant to continue studies of natural oil seeps and track the impacts of the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem. Known as ECOGIG-2 or “Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and… Read more »

 

Skidaway Institute scientists seek answers to salt marsh questions

Salt marshes are a vital part of the coastal ecosystem. They provide a nursery for many kinds of marine animal life. Sitting in the transition zone between the ocean and the land, salt marshes serve as a physical buffer against severe weather. They act as a chemical buffer by capturing, holding and releasing nutrients that… Read more »