UGA Skidaway Inst Blog

Skidaway microplastics study get's front-page coverage

A “just-starting” research project into the extent of microplastics pollution on the Georgia coast was featured on the front page of this morning’s Savannah Morning News. Hat’s off to Skidaway Institute’s Jay Brandes and UGA Marine Extension’s Dodie Sanders. http://savannahnow.com/news/2016-01-26/skidaway-researchers-look-plastics-local-shrimp-fish

 

Skidaway Institute Arctic carbon research gets additional exposure

The Website Environmental Monitor published a good article on some of the work Skidaway Institute scientist Aron Stubbins has been conducting on carbon in black carbon in the Arctic.  http://www.fondriest.com/news/arctic-ocean-biochar-could-increase-with-global-warming.htm

 

Jay Brandes interviewed on GPB

Skidaway Institute professor Jay Brandes was interviewed on Georgia Public Broadcasting regarding the recent move to ban microbeads and his upcoming project on microplastic pollution on the Georgia coast. http://www.gpb.org/news/2016/01/13/microbeads-banned-plastic-remains-threat-oceans

 

Black Gill cruise video on YouTube

It’s been a month and a half since we completed the fall Black Gill research cruise, but we’re finally getting around to posting a video on the day. Click on the photo to view the video on YouTube.  

 

UGA researchers study microplastics on Georgia coast

Images such as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch have attracted much attention to the problem of large-size marine debris, but another serious issue has garnered less visibility—marine microplastics. University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography scientists Jay Brandes and Thais Bittar and UGA Marine Extension educator Dodie Sanders are hoping to change that and have… Read more »

 

New convention center exhibit touches on Skidaway Institute history

UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography had an interesting beginning. In 1968, Robert and Dorothy Roebling donated their Modena Plantation on the north end of Skidaway Island to the state to be the site for an oceanographic institute. The Roebling family has a fascinating, going back to Robert’s great grandfather, John Augustus Roebling, who designed and… Read more »