carbon

UGA Skidaway Institute scientists investigate missing carbon mystery

Until now, scientists believed the black carbon in the ocean was introduced there by rivers. However, a new paper published in Nature Communications by a collaborative group of scientists, including University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography professor Jay Brandes and graduate student Kun Ma, questions that assumption and presents researchers with a new mystery.

 

Warming climate may release vast amounts of carbon from long-frozen Arctic soils

Savannah, Ga. – While climatologists are carefully watching carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, another group of scientists is exploring a massive storehouse of carbon that has the potential to significantly affect the climate change picture. University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography researcher Aron Stubbins is part of a team investigating how ancient carbon,… Read more »

 

Molecular-level relationships key to deciphering ocean carbon

Athens, Ga. – From beach shallows to the ocean depths, vast numbers of chemical compounds work together to reduce and store atmospheric carbon in the world’s oceans.  In the past, studying the connections between ocean-borne compounds and microbes has been impractical because of the sheer complexity of each. Three University of Georgia faculty members—along with… Read more »

 

Skidaway Institute Arctic carbon research gets additional exposure

The Website Environmental Monitor published a good article on some of the work Skidaway Institute scientist Aron Stubbins has been conducting on carbon in black carbon in the Arctic.  http://www.fondriest.com/news/arctic-ocean-biochar-could-increase-with-global-warming.htm