marine chemistry

A postcard from the Goldschmidt Conference in Barcelona

UGA/Skidaway Institute graduate student Kun Ma, from Jay Brandes’ lab, was invited to present some of her research at the prestigious Goldschmidt Conference in Barcelona, Spain. She sent us this “postcard.” Time surely goes by fast when there are so many exciting presentations about fascinating sciences going on, it’s already day three of the Goldschmidt… Read more »

 

Postcard from Finland – July 4th in Scandinavia

Editor’s note: UGA Skidaway Institute professor Jay Brandes and graduate student Kun Ma are on a three-week research trip to a marine lab in Finland and sent this update. Being here in Finland, the 4th of July is just another day at work. That doesn’t mean that it was uneventful, however. I gave a talk… Read more »

 

Warming climate may release vast amounts of carbon from long-frozen Arctic soils

Savannah, Ga. – While climatologists are carefully watching carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, another group of scientists is exploring a massive storehouse of carbon that has the potential to significantly affect the climate change picture. University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography researcher Aron Stubbins is part of a team investigating how ancient carbon,… Read more »

 

UGA Skidaway Institute research paper selected for Research Spotlight

Savannah, Ga. – A research paper by University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography scientist Aron Stubbins has been selected by the Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences to be featured as a Research Spotlight on the journal’s website and in the magazine Eos. Research Spotlights summarize the the best accepted articles for the Earth and space… Read more »

 

Molecular-level relationships key to deciphering ocean carbon

Athens, Ga. – From beach shallows to the ocean depths, vast numbers of chemical compounds work together to reduce and store atmospheric carbon in the world’s oceans.  In the past, studying the connections between ocean-borne compounds and microbes has been impractical because of the sheer complexity of each. Three University of Georgia faculty members—along with… Read more »